Install Theme

cross-connect:

Los Angeles native Jeff Nishinaka is the world’s premier paper sculptor with a prolific career. His portfolio spans a wide range including Bloomingdale’s, Sprint, Visa, Penn State University, Paramount Pictures and Coca Cola. Over the years he has found various techniques in how to manipulate and bend paper to make these magnificent masterpieces.

Nishinaka began working in paper quite by accident.

I have always wanted to be a painter, but while studying illustration at Art Center, I was given assignments in both a graphic design and fashion drawing class at the same time to experiment in different mediums, one of them being paper. That was my ‘Ah-ha!’ moment. I quickly developed a feel for working with paper. From then on, I began experimenting with different papers, finding ways to shape, bend, and round edges on it. I wanted to manipulate paper in the least invasive way, to keep the integrity and feel of it. Paper to me is a living, breathing thing that has a life of it’s own. I just try to redirect that energy into something that feels animated and alive…

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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Mary Burton Durell.

Mary Burton Durell creates worlds. Genuinely. She uses sheets of translucent paper to create tiny compartments, individual cells that she molds into these vast growths of bulbuous coral – organic structures that seem simple, poetic even despite their complexity. (by )

cross-connect:

Matt Shlian is a Michigan-based artist who describes himself as a paper engineer; he uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture from paper.

I cannot explain how I make my sculptures in a general sense- each one is different.  I don’t share my diagrams or cut patterns.  I learned by taking things apart, doing things the “wrong way” and being curious.  Getting something wrong is way more important to learning than copying something perfectly. 

My process is extremely varied from piece to piece.  Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow. Along the way something usually goes wrong and a mistake becomes more interesting than the original idea and I work with that instead. I’d say mystarting point is curiosity; I have to make the work in order to understand it. If I can completely visualize my final result I have no reason to make it- I need to be surprised.

cyanea:

Guy Laramee

So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint romantic landscapes. Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. They erode a bit more and they become hills. Then they flatten and become fields where apparently nothing is happening. Piles of obsolete encyclopedias return to that which does not need to say anything, that which simply IS. Fogs and clouds erase everything we know, everything we think we are.

sailorgil:

" Ship "  …  Painting by Artist:  Justyna Kopania, Poland

(Source: studiounderthemoon.deviantart.com)